CLEAN ENERGY PORT: A Key Element of the Gdansk City Infrastructure

CLEAN ENERGY PORT: A Key Element of the Gdansk City Infrastructure

ERCIM News 136

Photo: Installation of components of the exhaust gas treatment system onto the support structure.

Image source: https://portczystejenergii.prowly.com/presskits/aktualizowane-zdjecia-z-budowy/7/page

The thermal processing plant for municipal trash in Gdansk – our local partner – is the final hub of the municipal trash management system with a metropolitan impact, as it will receive waste from three municipal facilities covering about 40 communities. The thermal processing of solid and thermal trash contributes to the generation of electricity and heat, reducing the consumption of fossil fuels and greenhouse gas emissions, and, thanks to BAT (Best Available Techniques), minimizes the negative impact on the environment and reduces emissions of harmful substances and maximizes the potential of non-recyclable waste. The plant is expected to be commissioned at the end of the first quarter of 2024.

The parameters of the Clean Energy Port are impressive. The nominal capacity of the boiler is 62.7 MW, and the installed electric and thermal capacities are 16 MWe and 44 MWt, respectively. The facility will produce 109 GWh of electricity annually, which is a significant contribution to local demand. Working in cogeneration, annual heat production will be 509 TJ which will meet the needs of 30,000 households during the heating season. The combustion temperature will oscillate between 850-1050°C, and the daily throughput will be 495 tons. These figures confirm the plant’s importance for the sustainable development of the city and the region.

Investment is also, or even primarily, being made in the education of the public. These activities are aimed at preventing waste, minimizing waste and preparing waste for reuse, which is a key element of a responsible approach to waste management and will contribute to reducing society’s negative impact on the environment.

ERCIM News 136

Photo: Port of Clean Energy in Gdansk.

Image source: https://portczystejenergii.prowly.com/presskits/aktualizowane-zdjecia-z-budowy

ERCIM News 136

Photo: Port of Clean Energy in Gdansk.

Image source: https://portczystejenergii.prowly.com/presskits/aktualizowane-zdjecia-z-budowy

Tailoring Decarbonisation and Resilience Strategies to Drive Regional and Local Action: Read the latest news in ERCIM News!

Tailoring Decarbonisation and Resilience Strategies to Drive Regional and Local Action: Read the latest news in ERCIM News!

ERCIM News 136

In the research and Innovation section of the January issue of ERCIM News, the LOCALISED project is spotlighted for Tailoring Decarbonisation and Resilience Strategies to Drive Regional and Local Action. 

As highlighted in ERCIM News 136, existing European information platforms supporting a shift to a net-zero energy system have so far been limited in providing information for promoting this transition only targeting the national level. Therefore, LOCALISED is designed to close the information gap between national-level decarbonisation plans and local needs for planning and implementing an energy transition towards net-zero while accounting for remaining adaptation.

Transitioning to a green economy requires a shift in investment and education

Transitioning to a green economy requires a shift in investment and education

Transitioning to a green economy requires a shift in investment and education

A commonly held perspective, endorsed by scientists, policymakers, and the public at large, asserts that tackling the climate crisis and promoting sustainable development must be interconnected. To facilitate a shift toward a green global economy while still enabling ongoing economic growth, substantial changes in the structure of global production and consumption are necessary. Nevertheless, the specifics of resource reallocation—how and where it should occur—remain contingent upon the assumptions made regarding the pace of the green transition.

A recent paper—by our LOCALISED partner CMCC—explores three transition scenarios, each characterised by the pace of the shift from a fossil-fuel-based economy (brown) to a renewable energy-dominated one (green). These scenarios include a constant (linear) transition, a rapid transition, and a delayed transition. The paper analyses the demands of each pathway in terms of reallocating capital and labour, as well as investing in capital stocks and research and development (R&D). Through this analysis, one can identify key factors influencing various transition paths and inform overall policy priorities.

This paper builds on a widely used integrated assessment model of climate change and economy and introduces several important changes and additions that enable the representation of the green transition in a simplified but relevant manner. Specifically, our model, shown in the figure above, has two productive sectors, one “green” and one “brown”. Capital and labour can be moved between these two sectors at a certain cost. Moreover, long-term productivity growth depends on R&D investments which must be allocated between the two sectors.

Comparing different transition pathways, the first implication of the speed of the transition is for the trajectory of CO2 emissions where fast transition entails deeper and earlier reduction of the emissions while the other pathways reduce emissions more gradually. Across scenarios, transitions are achieved through different combinations of factor transfers from the “brown” to the “green” sector and investments in green capital stocks and R&D. In particular, the fast transition pathway relies very heavily on transfers of capital from the “brown” to the “green” sector with labour reallocation being comparatively more limited and homogeneous across scenarios. The fast pathway also requires substantial emission abatement efforts in the “brown” sector, which results in a sharp decline in emissions. The slower pathways, meanwhile, feature a larger amount of investment and capital accumulation generated within the “green” sector itself, hence avoiding a part of the cost associated with reallocating capital across sectors.

LOCALISED has joined forces with the MAIA Multiply Program

LOCALISED has joined forces with the MAIA Multiply Program

LOCALISED has joined forces with the MAIA Multiply Program

To accelerate local decarbonization efforts and foster informed decision-making on climate action, the LOCALISED project became part of the MAIA community, which collects networks platforms, expertise and research on climate change, with the overall aim of increasing project visibility and engagement.

The MAIA Multiply program serves as a platform to bring together initiatives committed to tackling the challenges of climate change. Indeed, it aims to amplify the impact of projects like LOCALISED by fostering connections and facilitating knowledge exchange

Currently, we have taken the opportunity offered by MAIA to highlight our project through a featured News. This article allows us to introduce LOCALISED by promoting the engagement of urban decarbonisation practitioners, regional authorities and governance experts, and all key actors in shaping a sustainable, climate-resilient future.

In the implementation of the project’s communication, dissemination and exploitation strategy, it is crucial to leverage resources and create synergies in order to extend the transfer of results for uptake by other stakeholders and to build a community that enables the exploration of different outreach-related activities. By joining the MAIA Multiply programme, LOCALISED is entering a new opportunity to generate collective impact.

 

Gender and Diversity monitoring in  multidisciplinary research projects: have a look at the LOCALISED experience

Gender and Diversity monitoring in multidisciplinary research projects: have a look at the LOCALISED experience

Systematic  observation of  the Jury meeting of the Viennese district of Floridsdorf in October 2023. Photo credit: © MA 20 / Fürthner

In today’s research landscape, Gender and Diversity are increasingly recognized as vital elements of working culture and integral components of multidisciplinary research teams. However, while many projects acknowledge their importance, gender and diversity monitoring is often less prominent. 

In LOCALISED, we have incorporated gender and diversity as fundamental aspects of our project management approach, with regular monitoring by all project partners. Indeed, we have developed a methodology, outlined in our official report (LOCALISED Deliverable 1.5), to guide our own project, but also to serve as a prototype for promoting gender mainstreaming, inclusivity and diversity in all Horizon 2020/Horizon Europe research projects.

In order to provide insights on how to translate our commitment to gender and diversity into tangible actions and outcomes within multidisciplinary research projects, we have created an easy-to-use and engaging factsheet which provides essential information in a concise form. The “Gender and Diversity monitoring in multidisciplinary research projects” factsheet outlines the main strategies employed within the LOCALISED project to ensure gender equality and diversity at four levels (institutional, structural, communicational, and research). Special attention is given to the professional and personal links and understanding between team members in project activities.

PIK hosted a workshop on how to progress climate-friendly construction

PIK hosted a workshop on how to progress climate-friendly construction

Systematic  observation of  the Jury meeting of the Viennese district of Floridsdorf in October 2023. Photo credit: © MA 20 / Fürthner

Our partner PIK hosted a three-day workshop entitled “Towards a Climate Positive Built Environment Using Bio-based and Re-used Materials“. The workshop was organised as part of a Connective Cities dialogue event and gathered 40 international participants among local government, business and civil society, including the Mayor of Potsdam, Mike Schubert, who met to exchange expertise and to discuss local project ideas on how to advance climate-friendly construction.

The LOCALISED project coordinator – Professor Jürgen Kropp (Head of the Urban Transformation Group at PIK) – highlighted the relevance of local actions, with a particular focus on the construction sector. Indeed, the building sector is responsible for a large share of emissions and has a crucial role to play in achieving international climate targets.

As the city of Potsdam, which hosted the event, is also very active in the field of timber construction, two examples has been presented during the workshop. Other German municipalities are already active in either using bio-based materials for construction and/or renovation, or developing concepts for the reuse of materials in renovation processes. The Bauhaus Earth team therefore presented their plans for an experimental pavilion made of wood and other bio-based materials to be presented in Potsdam. Instead, the international guests brought with them new perspectives and ideas from traditional buildings and the challenges they face in their own countries, as well as from community approaches and concepts that they have successfully tested.

Overall, participants shared experiences and challenges, established new collaborations and developed plans to address pressing issues through mutual learning.